IT & Web Infrastructure Masterclasses

Through March 2013, I’m running a set of IT and Web infrastructure masterclasses in Nottingham (in conjunction with PCM Projects), for people who don’t necessarily work in IT, but need to know (or would benefit from knowing) some of the basics.

The intended audience is small business owners or managers, where you may have to deal with IT contractors or staff and decide IT and web strategy, but you’re not comfortable that you know enough about it to make informed decisions. For example, there are an almost infinite number of ways to keep your business data accessible, secure, backed up, and away from prying eyes, but which way is best for you? How should you manage your website – should you pay someone else to design and host it, or bring it in-house? How should you handle email, on what sort of server? How should you plan for business growth? How do you protect your business from viruses, malware, spam, and hacking attempts?

These are the sort of questions that I will help you with – you don’t need any knowledge of IT or the web already, and because the groups are small – around 6 people – you’ll be able to ask questions and find out information specific to how your business operates.

You’ll then have enough knowledge to go to your suppliers or contractors, and ask the right questions, purchase the right services, at the right price.

There are four sessions, as below, and you can book yourself on them by visiting the eventbrite page for the events. Contact me for any further information.

 

Technically Speaking – 4 March

Topics to include: an overview of web/IT infrastructure and how it all fits together; an update on the current climate; domain names, analytics, and connections to social technology.

 

Email & Communication – 11 March

Topics to include: different service providers and set-ups (e.g., using hosted email, managing it in-house) and getting it all working for PCs and on mobile devices; good email practice, transferring data and keeping it secure.

 

Internet Security – 18 March

Topics to include: how to stay safe and keep trading; what are the threats – viruses, hack attacks, theft, loss of confidential or valuable data; keeping your business (and family) safe on the internet; and keeping your systems up to date and secure.

 

Data storage – 25 March

Topics to include: managing data storage and growth in your business; internal networks and cloud storage; back-ups; access controls, speed vs. reliability vs. cost.

Total Cost of Ownership – missing benefits?

Total cost of ownership (TCO) is a measure applied to (usually) IT hardware to determine its true cost, and apply that to the cost-benefit analysis. It’s typically used to explain why (for example) a 3-year life cycle for desktop PCs might actually work out a lot less costly than replacing them every 5 years, due to most of the costs being involved in the management and maintenance of the unit itself, rather than the acquisition costs.

The management and maintenance costs usually increase as the hardware ages, partly due to the failure rate, service and support, but also the “cost” of an employee using slow hardware, and the extra time it takes to carry out their work. This cost is really visible when a machine gets so old and slow that the user struggles to operate with it, or the device actually fails. By then, however, the true cost has already exceeded the cost of a new device acquisition, so you’d have been better off replacing it before that point.

What is often missed, however, are the benefits of the new system, as many such benefits are either difficult to measure in financial terms, or they’re simply unknown until the new system is implemented. Of course, if you operate in a very small enterprise, spending too much time calculating the TCO, and attempting to identify the financial benefits of replacement systems could take so long that your time begins to affect the TCO itself, and you’d be better off making very rough estimates. Luckily, it is generally accepted that a 3-4 year lifecycle for desktop machines is appropriate in most cases, and it’s pretty safe to follow that sort of timescale.